Saturday, October 23, 2010

Persimmons Update

In the beginning of this blog back in March, I had a posting titled, "The Persimmons Mystery" and I borrowed a pretty pic from the internet because this plant is a complete mystery to me.  It was offered at our nursery for winter plantings and so I tried it out.  I've been impressed by the simple beauty of this tree.  It has grown slowly and produced only 1 fruit....the one you are looking at.....it is currently not ready to eat. It will turn an orangish/red color in November and be the last remaining thing on this deciduous plant before it turns completely bare. People love to use this word when writing about this plant...."astringent."  It has performed well during the summer heat and I am very glad to have it in the landscape.  I'm not sure what this fruit will taste like, but a final pic will be taken in November for your viewing pleasure along with my impressions of the flavor.  The fruit just turned this yellow color.  There are not many surprises anymore in life so this is something to look forward to next month:)

This week has been an incredibly busy time period for me.  I am currently working on my Day of the Dead projects with my students for an art display plus I had a SMART Board and some new furniture put into my room. As with anything, you have to bust your tookus off to get these things for your students because no one hands them over for free, but my room is now perfection.  Therefore, the blogging took a break just as things do when they get busy.  I am working currently on a lot of interesting posts that will be upcoming this week and into next.  This blogging is not only a record and journal of our grounds here at El Presidio but for me a fascinating look into the amount of things gardeners have to do besides just rake the leaves or blow the dirt off the patio......it's so much more.  Tomorrow's blog will be on shaping certain plants and appropriately titled, "Shaping:)

11 comments:

  1. I read this posting and see the word "I" way too many times...."I" don't like it as it drives me nuts reading it back outload. Sorry:(

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  2. Haha! I love the way you comment on your own blog. If it makes you feel any better, I didn't notice that 'I' was being mentioned many times. I just admired your ripening persimmon. It's great that you have your next posts prepared. Mine are all impromptu. I notice I have a lot 'I's in my comment. :)

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  3. Persimmons I know nothing about. I doubt it would grow here; it just looks like it doesn't like the cold!

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  4. I've never seen a persimmon plant before, although I've eaten the fruit (I find it too mushy for my taste). Your's is so juicy-looking!

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  5. I have never seen a persimmons tree, much less a real persimmon on a tree! We do get to buy persimmons from the market and I like them. The preserved persimmons are ok too. I have seen pictures of persimmon flowers and they look like that of my citrus plant.

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  6. Nice...is that an Asian or American Persimmon? The latter I remember from Oklahoma in some gardens, and the glossy leaves, then ripe fruits, were incredible. Exotic look, even though it was locally native.

    I think American Persimmon is native from N TX into SE Nebraska, then across central Illinois and Ohio to NJ. So, it can take cold, but I think it needs a long, warm to hot summer.

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  7. This persimmons is a Fuyo or the Japanese variety. Extremely tolerant plants of poor soil and heat....similiar to a fig in that way. I tried fresh figs for the first time this year and it was incredible.....I can't wait to see what a persimmons will taste like....when I did research on this plant, it was on the list of plants to grow in Tucson. I found that hard to believe....but it's doing great. My eyes have been opening to the fruit tree potential here....everything I thought would not do well is actually thriving....apples, persimmons, figs, mulberry, PEACHES, nectarines, apricots, and plums. It has been an incredible experience watching these plants thrive and make people smile. A neighbor picked a peach off the tree in July and was shocked that we could have fresh peaches on the property....may there be many more surprises to come:)

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  8. Persimmon fruit is delicious! I pick mine when they turn color but before fully ripe. Otherwise, creatures of the night love to come and feast before I even get a taste. Once they've colored up they will finish ripening for me inside. You may not have an animal problem where you are. Wait and see.

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  9. I wanted to stop by and thank you for commenting on my blog recently - and to throw my 2 cents in on the persimmons. They do really well here in SE Virginia, in fact one of my customers has over 60 trees and has named her house "Persimmon Hill". I'm sure you know the Asian varieties are either astringent or non-astringent. I like the non-a. best as they can be eaten while the flesh is still firm and crunchy. They others are just too mushy and too sweet for me to eat fresh, but I understand they are great to bake with. And what a beautiful tree, worth growing even if you never eat a single fruit.

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  10. Les beat me to the punch, discussing astringent vs non-astringent. According to what I have read, astringent ones are very very tannins, and should only be eaten after they softened. I'm anxious for your report!!

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  11. Astringent makes your mouth pucker up.

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